Disability Awareness Training with the Beavers!

With Sonny’s Beaver Troop working towards their Disability Awareness Badge, I thought it would be a great opportunity to teach them about all things visual impairment. Raising awareness early I feel should be the first port of call and the best way to eradicate any stigma attached to disabilities. It is especially helpful in children of such a young age as it can help form the fundamentals of their belief system. When planning my session I found a very helpful post from the Wonderbaby website that looked at teaching about blindness in sighted classrooms, if you would like to read … Read more

How my parents support me and my vision impairment- by Elin @myblurredworld

My name is Elin, I am a 19-year-old student and blogger from North Wales. I was diagnosed with a degenerative eye condition called Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) at the age of six and have since been diagnosed with another condition called Optic Disc Drusen shortly following my 19th birthday. I was registered blind/severely sight impaired when I was twelve years old and my vision has deteriorated drastically over the years meaning I have very little remaining vision to this day. One of my main goals in life is to raise as much awareness as possible surrounding the topic of vision impairment. … Read more

Parenting: VI Edition- By Grace Marsh

A few weeks after I was born – the long-awaited first child of a couple in their late twenties – my family realised that my eyes weren’t focusing on objects or people, and instantly began to worry. My mother in particular was stressed to the point of hair loss (everything other than her lashes fell out!), distraught at the prospect of having a child with a then unknown disability or illness. She lost weight and struggled immensely with stress and anxiety. Yet, here we are around seventeen years on; I lost what residual vision I did have three years ago, and … Read more

Sunflower Race Results

We would like to thank everyone who took part in #scarlettssunflower this year!  We’ve had some wonderful photographs taken and sent in from around the country and we would like to announce the Alma and Sophie Dawson as this years winners 🙂 Congratulations and your prize will be on its way to you soon!

The Talking Journey Continued: Tactile Cueing

I first wrote about Ronan’s struggle to speak (at least in any way understandable to the rest of us) when he was just over three in this blog. Ronan will be five in a few months and that journey continues. Ronan now talks a lot, but we still struggle with understanding what he is saying. Unlike with a sighted child in which there is often some shared visual context, Ronan could be talking about almost anything. He might naming the toilet that is flushing in the neighbouring terraced house. He might be talking about the slide we went on during … Read more

Bonding with your blind baby: Little Amber

I do not think we’d be alone in remembering back to those first two years with Ronan and the challenges of trying to figure out what worked for our blind baby. It never seemed to be what was written the books for other babies. While we had lots of smiles, we also had lots of tears that left us wondering what to do as new parents. We gradually built our connection with Ronan through music. We sang and sang and sang some more. We played with music toys and wrote musical stories for him. Indeed, Ronan, now almost five, has … Read more

Get Cycling

We live in a city in which 50% of people commute to work by bicycle at least once a week. Indeed, we rely solely on bicycles to get around. In a city so full of bicycles, we see daily how many shapes, sizes, and configurations they can come in. Some imaginable and some way beyond imaginable. We’ve been thinking for some time about what should be Ronan’s first bicycle. Ronan can spend hours in our front garden climbing up onto the seats of our various bicycles to ring the bells. Our bicycle park is like another child’s jungle gym with … Read more

The frustration of Scarlett’s frustration

In psychology frustration is a common emotional response to opposition. Related to anger, disappointment and annoyance, frustration arises from the perceived resistance to the fulfilment of an individual’s will or goal and is likely to increase when a person’s will or goal is blocked. This half-term holiday has highlighted Scarlett’s frustrations to me and when I explore the meaning of frustration I can see why my little girl has been experiencing some high levels of frustration over the last week. Scarlett is a very strong willed young lady, with limited motivators in Scarlett’s life, she has a very clear picture … Read more

The day I saw my daughter play

Scarlett my beautiful six year old angel of a daughter is blind, she has no useful vision, as she has grown older it has become very clear that she has a variety of very complex needs, she may be on the autism spectrum, she is none verbal and has difficulties around social and communication areas and she is developmentally delayed. Will more things become apparent as she gets older? Perhaps! The complex nature of my daughters disabilities and the cognitive processing issues Scarlett has she outstandingly oozes with personality. Until she came along I didn’t realise the level of communication and connection that can be … Read more

Visit to a birds of prey centre with a child who is blind

  Following on from my previous post which looked at a multi-sensory approach to developing the concept of a bird with a child who is blind and who has additional complex learning needs ‘Explaining the concept of a bird to a child that is blind – All things bird’ I finished off the bird experience with Scarlett with an Easter Holiday day out to Vale Royal Falconry to further explore birds. Prior to going to the centre I made sure I contacted ahead and explained to them what Scarlett’s needs were including her level of vision and her additional needs. … Read more