Early Years

There is no reason you can not apply for your child to start a local nursery or playgroup. It does not have to be specifically designed for children with Visual Impairments and it is necessary to contact you local council to see if your child can be supported in the environment.

scarlettimageThe start of primary education can be an anxious time for parents and children. However, if everyone who is going to be involved with your child’s transition into primary school communicates and works together, your child can get the best support possible to enjoy school. The most important things in the primary stage are for your child to be able to access the curriculum, and become more independent in learning and socialising.

Learning through play

Children who have a sight problem learn to live without using their eyes. In the Early Years one of a child’s first learning experiences is derived through play. The RNIB provide a very good guide on play in the Eraly Years and looks at how adapted toys and accessible games can be used to help aid a child’s development.

The RNIB offer a very helpful guide for Learning Through Play. Please click here for further information.

Social Inclusion

There can be problems with Social Inclusion associated to visually impaired children. Difficulties that young blind children can experience in accessing play and therefore in developing important social skills. Encouraging visually impaired children to socialise and to make bonds during this crucial age is important.

The RNIB offer a very helpful guide to Social Inclusion. Please click here for further information.

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