Giving Music Therapy a Go

Our QTVI recommended music therapy for Ronan when he was about 18 months. Through word of mouth we found a Greek music therapist who had just finished his degree. We ask him whether he wanted a challenge – music therapy for a very young blind child in Greek. Fortunately, he did.

The music therapy sessions starts with the music therapy song to bring focus to the coming activities. A number of activities follow depending on what Ronan asks for: there are action songs which the music therapist accompanies on the ukulele or the piano; there is sound play to stimulate language development; turn-taking games to support communication; manipulation activities with different instruments for hand development; and of course, there is hand-over-hand piano playing just for fun. See the video to get an idea of what the boys get up to.

Ronan has a keen interest in music, but is much less keen on structured activities. It took a couple of sessions before Ronan found the rhythm, but now music therapy is the highlight of the week. The name of the music therapist brings a cry of delight. We, as parents, are quite amazed at the music therapist’s ability to adapt to any indication of engagement Ronan gives, making up songs and sounds to match.

Ronan has had many professionals involved in his development, but music therapy has been by far the most successful in engaging Ronan is those developmental areas he struggles with, especially language and communication.

 

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