The frustration of Scarlett’s frustration

In psychology frustration is a common emotional response to opposition. Related to anger, disappointment and annoyance, frustration arises from the perceived resistance to the fulfilment of an individual’s will or goal and is likely to increase when a person’s will or goal is blocked. This half-term holiday has highlighted Scarlett’s frustrations to me and when I explore the meaning of frustration I can see why my little girl has been experiencing some high levels of frustration over the last week. Scarlett is a very strong willed young lady, with limited motivators in Scarlett’s life, she has a very clear picture … Read more

Scarlett’s Sunflower Race 2017

We had so much fun with our sunflower race last year and are excited to be launching it once again. We will be measuring our sunflowers slightly differently this year by comparing their height with a set series of household items. All will be revealed when you receive your entry packs! We will be asking you to share your photos once your flower reaches each of the marker heights. The sunflower to reach the final marker first will be victorious! There will be a prize for the winner and also some runners up treats for the families who share the most photos. … Read more

VICTA Christmas Competition

Decorate our VICTA Christmas tree for treats! For a few years now our VICTA Christmas tree has been looking a little sad and we need your help to spruce it up this year! We are running a competition in which we would like children of all ages to make a decoration to send in to us. We will then be decorating our tree throughout December and sharing photos on our website and social media for you all to see. There will be prizes for first, second and third place and a little treat for all the runners up to say thank … Read more

Fostering positivity and confidence in your blind child – By Holly Scott Gardner

I didn’t realise that blind people weren’t supposed to do things for a very long time. I grew up playing football, fighting my sister and reading all the books I could get my hands on. My childhood, although not perfect, was painfully ordinary in many ways. My blindness was never viewed by my parents as a tragedy, or something to worry about, it was simply another part of who I was. As far as I knew, blind adults went to university, got jobs and raised families. I had no idea that society didn’t have those kinds of expectations of us. … Read more